Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: Stages, Symptoms, and Navigating the Journey

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: Stages, Symptoms, and Navigating the Journey

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP) is a rare and complex neurodegenerative disorder that affects approximately 6 out of every 100,000 people worldwide. The disease primarily impacts the elderly, with most cases developing after the age of 60. PSP is characterized by progressive problems with balance, movement, vision, speech, and swallowing. This blog post aims to provide an in-depth look at the stages of PSP, its associated symptoms, and ways to manage the condition.

What is Progressive Supranuclear Palsy?

PSP is a type of parkinsonism, which refers to a group of neurological disorders that share similar features with Parkinson's disease, such as rigidity, bradykinesia (slowness of movement), and postural instability. However, PSP is distinct from Parkinson's disease in terms of its underlying pathology, symptoms, and progression. PSP involves the deterioration of certain brain cells, particularly those in the brainstem, basal ganglia, and cerebellum. The disease is associated with the buildup of abnormal protein deposits called tau, which are believed to contribute to the loss of brain cells.

Stages and Symptoms of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

The progression of PSP can be divided into three main stages: early, middle, and late. It is important to note that the symptoms and progression of PSP can vary greatly among individuals, and not everyone will experience the same symptoms or timeline.

  1. Early Stage PSP

During the early stage of PSP, symptoms are generally mild and may be difficult to distinguish from other neurological disorders or age-related changes. Common early symptoms include:

a. Balance and Gait Disturbances: Individuals may experience unsteadiness and frequent falls, often occurring when walking or changing positions. Falls are typically backward, and individuals may have difficulty recovering their balance.

b. Visual Problems: Early signs of visual disturbances may include difficulties with downward gaze, double vision, and involuntary eye movements (nystagmus).

c. Mild Cognitive and Personality Changes: Individuals may exhibit subtle changes in personality, such as increased irritability, apathy, or depression. Mild cognitive impairment, including problems with memory and attention, may also be present.

  1. Middle Stage PSP

As the disease progresses to the middle stage, symptoms become more pronounced and can significantly impact an individual's daily functioning. Common middle stage symptoms include:

a. Increased Gait and Balance Problems: Balance and gait disturbances become more severe, leading to frequent falls and an increased risk of injury. Walking may become shuffling, with reduced arm swing and a tendency to lean backward.

b. Supranuclear Ophthalmoplegia: This hallmark symptom of PSP involves the inability to voluntarily move the eyes in certain directions, particularly vertically. This can result in difficulties with reading, watching television, or recognizing faces.

c. Dysarthria and Dysphagia: Individuals may experience speech problems (dysarthria), such as slurred or slow speech, and swallowing difficulties (dysphagia) that can lead to choking, aspiration, or malnutrition.

d. Pseudobulbar Affect: This condition is characterized by episodes of uncontrollable laughing or crying that may be inappropriate or unrelated to the individual's emotional state.

e. Cognitive Decline and Apathy: Cognitive problems may become more apparent, with difficulties in planning, organizing, and problem-solving. Apathy, or a lack of motivation and interest in activities, can also worsen during this stage.

  1. Late Stage PSP

In the late stage of PSP, individuals may become severely disabled and require assistance with most daily activities. Common late-stage symptoms include:

a. Severe Mobility Limitations: At this stage, individuals may be unable to walk or stand independently and may require a wheelchair or other mobility aids. Transferring from one position to another may also be extremely challenging and require assistance from caregivers.

b. Rigidity and Dystonia: Muscle stiffness (rigidity) and abnormal muscle contractions (dystonia) can lead to painful cramps, joint deformities, and further restrictions in movement.

c. Advanced Dysphagia: Swallowing difficulties can progress to the point where individuals may require a feeding tube to ensure proper nutrition and hydration.

d. Severe Cognitive Impairment: Memory, attention, and executive functioning may decline significantly, with some individuals developing symptoms consistent with dementia.

e. Communication Difficulties: The ability to speak and communicate effectively may become severely limited, with some individuals becoming mute or relying on nonverbal means of communication.

Managing Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

While there is currently no cure for PSP, there are various ways to manage symptoms and improve the quality of life for individuals with the disease. Some approaches include:

  1. Medications: Although there are no specific medications approved for the treatment of PSP, certain medications used for Parkinson's disease, such as levodopa, may provide temporary relief from some symptoms, particularly rigidity and bradykinesia. Antidepressants and anti-anxiety medications may be prescribed to address mood-related symptoms.

  2. Physical and Occupational Therapy: Engaging in regular physical and occupational therapy can help maintain mobility, balance, and strength, as well as promote independence in daily activities. Therapists may recommend adaptive equipment, such as walkers or wheelchairs, to improve safety and mobility.

  3. Speech and Swallowing Therapy: A speech-language pathologist can provide strategies to improve speech clarity and swallowing function, reducing the risk of choking or aspiration.

  4. Eye Care: Regular eye exams and consultation with an ophthalmologist can help monitor and manage vision problems associated with PSP. In some cases, prism glasses may be recommended to alleviate double vision or improve downward gaze.

  5. Supportive Care: As PSP progresses, individuals may require increased assistance with daily activities, including personal care, feeding, and mobility. Home modifications, such as grab bars or ramps, can improve safety and accessibility.

  6. Emotional Support: Living with PSP can be emotionally challenging for both individuals with the disease and their families. Support groups, counseling, and other mental health resources can provide valuable emotional support and coping strategies.

Progressive Supranuclear Palsy is a complex and challenging disease that can significantly impact the lives of those affected. Understanding the stages and symptoms of PSP is crucial for early diagnosis, appropriate management, and the ability to plan for future care needs. While there is no cure for PSP, a multidisciplinary approach to symptom management, including medication, therapy, and supportive care, can help improve the quality of life for individuals with the disease and their families.

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6 comments

Dear Phyllis

I’m truly sorry to hear about the challenges you and your husband are facing. It sounds like a very demanding situation. Here are a few steps you could consider:

1. Professional Assessment: If you haven’t already, seek a thorough assessment from a healthcare professional or a specialist who understands your husband’s condition. They might offer guidance on managing his symptoms, improving his comfort, or even enhancing his mobility to some degree.

2. Home Health Care Services: Consider increasing the hours of the certified nursing assistant or hiring additional help to reduce your physical load. There are home health care agencies that provide a range of services, from personal care to physical therapy, which could also benefit your husband’s condition.

3. Support Groups and Respite Care: Look for caregiver support groups in your community. These groups do not only offer emotional support but also practical tips and resources. Additionally, respite care services can give you a temporary break, making it possible to rest and recharge.

4. Swallowing Assessment: The issue with choking on liquids is concerning. A speech therapist can assess your husband’s swallowing function and may recommend strategies or modifications to his diet to help prevent choking.

5. Physical Therapy and Occupational Therapy: These therapists can work on mobility and fall prevention strategies. They can also adapt the living environment to make daily tasks as safe and manageable as possible for both of you.

6. Medical Equipment: If you haven’t already, you might want to explore equipment that can assist with transferring your husband, like a Hoyer lift, which can significantly ease the physical strain on you.

7. Financial and Legal Counseling: Consider seeking advice from a financial advisor or elder law attorney familiar with such situations. They can guide you on protecting your assets, understanding health insurance coverage, or possibly qualifying for additional assistance programs.

Remember, it’s essential to maintain your health and well-being during this time, too. It is not selfish to ensure you are also supported; doing so is vital for both you and your husband.

Hugs xx
Laura

Laura Louizos

My husband seems very aware of what’s going on around him. He needs constant care in his mobility when transferring from his chair to wheelchair. He falls without support. I need help in his progress in this terrible disease. I’m 71 years old and it’s getting harder to help him in his mobility. He often chokes on liquids, but can eat foods without choking. Where do I go from now? I do not want to put him in a facility. I have a can 3 days a week for 4 hours a day. What do you think I should do?
.

Phyllis Cucinotta

My brother in law ,had PSP ,but he passed on on 7th September 2023, its not easy at all watching people go through these
stages

Nana

Haig,
I’m truly sorry to hear about your aunt’s diagnosis and the rapid progression of her symptoms. PSP is indeed a challenging condition, and it can be heart-wrenching to watch a loved one face its effects. Remember to take care of your own emotional well-being as well and consider seeking support, whether it’s through family, friends, or support groups. It’s essential to lean on each other during these difficult times. Sending you strength and warmth.
xx hugs

Laura

My aunt was diagnosed with PSP a couple years ago and her symptoms seem to be progressing very quickly. Difficult to watch her go through this.

HAIG YOUREDJIAN

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