Community Care Support Program

In response to the overwhelming inquires for our respite care program, we have created the Community Care Support Program CCSP.

The CCSP provides guidance and connects individuals and families in Canada touched by Atypical Parkinsonism to supports and resources available by the government and health care system.

We have found many individuals are in need of support and guidance to navigate and access the supports that are available to them in the community and from the government. We help streamline the process by providing links and resources to programs and services available in their community and advocate on their behalf.

No One Walks Alone!

 

See below resources for support or contact us below if you require help navigating the community support services.

 

Ontario, Canada

Home and Community Care Support Services - Previously the Local Health Integration Networks (LHINs)

Home and Community Care Support Services are provided by a network of regional organizations covering the province. These organizations support people of all ages who require care in their home, at school or in the community. Many services can help seniors and people with complex medical conditions live in their homes for as long as possible.

If you qualify, the Ontario government pays for a wide range of services in your home and community. If you don’t qualify for home care, you may still be eligible for community support services that may have client co-payments. You can also get help from private companies for a fee.

How to access services

Contact your Home and Community Care Support Services organization by calling 310-2222 (no area code required) or use the online map locator.

Once you make contact you will be connected with a care coordinator who will determine if you qualify for government-funded home care services. If you don’t qualify, they can tell you about other services available in your community that you can access directly.

Care coordinators are regulated health professionals with expertise in nursing, social work, occupational therapy, physiotherapy or speech therapy. Care coordinators work directly with patients in hospitals, doctors’ offices, communities, schools and in patients' homes. They will use their knowledge and assessment skills to:

  • assess your needs, determine your eligibility and develop your care plan
  • help coordinate home care services
  • tell you about, refer you and connect you with local community services that could help you, your caregiver or the person you are caring for
  • provide information about long-term care homes and other housing options, and coordinate placement
  • offer access to respite services

Types of services available

Housing options

Your care coordinator can provide information about:

  • long-term care homes, assess your eligibility for admission and help you with the application process
  • housing alternatives (for example, supportive housing and retirement homes)
  • financial options

For more information about housing options for seniors, please see the housing section of this guide.

Services from health care professionals

If you are eligible for home care services, they may include:

  • nursing care
  • physiotherapy
  • occupational therapy
  • speech-language therapy
  • social work
  • nutrition/dietetics services
  • home healthcare supplies

Personal support services

If you are eligible for personal support services, these include assistance with:

  • washing and bathing
  • mouth care
  • hair care
  • preventative skin care
  • getting in and out of chairs, vehicles or bed
  • dressing and undressing
  • eating
  • toileting
  • getting to appointments

Homemaking services

Homemaking services can help you maintain a safe and comfortable home by assisting you with routine household activities, including:

  • housecleaning
  • doing laundry
  • shopping
  • banking
  • paying bills
  • planning menus and preparing meals.

Community support services

Many communities have services just for seniors and other people who may need support to continue living independently at home. You may have to pay a fee for some of these programs or you may find there is funding or subsidies available. Some of these services are offered only in larger communities. Services can include:

  • adult day programs that provide planned and supervised activities in a group setting (transportation, meals and personal care are usually provided)
  • assisted living services that support high-risk seniors who need a greater level of care and service
  • foot care and cleaning services provided by trained staff
  • home maintenance, such as snow shoveling or yard maintenance, and repair services
  • meals that can be delivered to you or arrangements for you to enjoy a meal with others in the community
  • regular friendly visits or help running errands for isolated senior
  • routine telephone security/reassurance checks to ensure you are not in crisis or at risk of physical harm
  • installation of home and personal devices that connect to emergency response services
  • transportation services for when you need help or existing options are not available to you

Indigenous Services

Indigenous Ontarians are also eligible for Indigenous cultural support services, which can help Indigenous patients, families, and communities connect with providers of a range of services. You can learn more by contacting Home and Community Care Support Services.

Find information about primary care for Indigenous seniors in the Health and well-being chapter of this guide.

Respite services

Home and Community Care Support Services organizations can connect patients and families to respite services. These services can offer caregivers a break from their duties. Patients may receive services on a respite basis through:

  • an adult day program
  • a personal support worker visit at home
  • a short stay in a long-term care home

End-of-life services

Hospice palliative care is a philosophy of care that aims to relieve suffering and improve the quality of living and dying. It strives to help individuals and families address physical, psychological, social, spiritual and practical issues related to the process of dying.

If you or a loved one requires end-of-life care at home, there are many programs in Ontario that can help you. You can request:

  • nursing and personal care
  • medical supplies
  • low-cost medication for seniors through the¬†Ontario Drug Benefit Plan
  • tests
  • hospital and sickroom equipment
  • transportation to other health services
  • help to manage pain
  • home hospice services including in-home visits
  • respite care by trained volunteers

Friendly visits and calls

A Friendly Voice

A Friendly Voice is a free, confidential phone line for older Ontarians, 55+ who just want to chat with a friendly person.

Friendly Calls Program

The Friendly Calls Program connects adults with Red Cross volunteers who provide supportive listening, social interaction and emotional support. Home and community care clients over the age of 65 are prioritized, but this service is available to all adults across Ontario who may benefit from a friendly call to help reduce anxiety, depression, or loneliness.

Registration for this program is available by email only at ONFriendlyCalls@redcross.ca

Meals on Wheels

Meals on Wheels delivers nutritious, delicious and affordable meals to a variety of groups, including:

  • seniors, people with physical disabilities and cognitive impairments
  • individuals suffering from illnesses and recovering from surgeries
  • those who need special dietary planning and assistance

Seniors Active Living Centre programs

Available across the province, Seniors Active Living Centre programs consist of social, cultural, learning and recreational activities that encourage community involvement and help seniors stay active, independent and engaged. These virtual and in-person programs serve a wide range of individuals, ranging from those who are very healthy to those who require support in order to continue living independently in the community.

Seniors are often directly involved in operating these programs in roles that may include serving on the board of directors, advising on program planning and acting as volunteers. 

Find a seniors active living centre near you.

 

Contact us for assistance to navigate the Community Care Supports in your area;

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